Life From This Point

A Blog About Retirement & Aging

January 22, 2017
by Janet Holt
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Downsizing

This dreary January day finds me in Houston helping a long-time friend complete her move to a smaller home. Sally is downsizing because she recently had to move her husband, ravaged by the effects of dementia for several years, to a safer environment. It has been a difficult transition for her not only because she is adjusting to living alone again but also because she has had to shed so many possessions. Continue Reading →

November 4, 2016
by Janet Holt
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Divided We Fall

You haven’t heard from me in awhile because I’ve been traveling and writing from the road was a lot harder than I thought it would be.  This post has nothing to do with aging except for the fact I never thought I would see what is occurring in our United States. Continue Reading →

August 31, 2016
by Janet Holt
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Someday

We spend a great deal of our adult lives taking care of business and preparing for the future.  We think about our plans for “someday” but our focus is on paying bills, raising children, building careers and establishing our place in the community.  Then, in what seems like the blink of an eye in hindsight, you wake up to find the kids have grown up, the roots are down and you’re at retirement age.  Someday has arrived. Now what? Continue Reading →

July 29, 2016
by Janet Holt
2 Comments

Ageism

Do you need help with that?”  asked the pleasant teenager who had bagged my groceries.  “No thanks, I’ve got it,” I replied as I reached for the handles of my canvas totes. His next words caught me by surprise. “Are you sure?”  he asked with a doubtful look on his face.  The first retort that came to mind was, “Do I look feeble to you, kid?”  Which was followed immediately by the thought, “Oh crap, maybe I do!” 

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July 22, 2016
by Janet Holt
2 Comments

Becoming an Orphaned Adult

I was 32 when my father died after a long struggle with cancer.  Because he was ill for so long we had time to spend together saying what needed to be said. In essence, we grieved his death together. After he was gone I missed him terribly, but my attention turned to meeting the needs of my mother and helping her adjust to life as a widow. When she died suddenly 11 years later I was totally unprepared for the devastating sense of loss I experienced.  It wasn’t that I loved my mother more than I loved my dad.  It was because it suddenly hit me that I was no longer anyone’s daughter. I was an orphan. Continue Reading →